How to Measure Mouse Lag with Latency Test

What is Mouse Latency?

As already mentioned, the latency also occurs in mice while using them on the computer system.

A Mouse Latency is calculated by how long it takes for the mouse’s input to be recorded by the computer once the mouse click switch is pressed down.

The frequency of this problem occurring is more in wireless mouse than the wired one. For example, while you are playing a shooting game, you click to shoot a bullet, but on your screen, the shot is fired with a delay. It clearly means your mouse is lagging. 

There might be several reasons for it. Like an outdated driver, any hardware problem, or even an operating system error. However, there are multiple ways to fix a mouse lag

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How to use Mouse Rate Checker Tool?

To start the Mouse Polling rate checker, click on the “click to start” button. After that, the tool will begin showing the polling rate of your Mouse.

You can see the average and the maximum mouse polling rate in Hz in between the ongoing process. Once you get enough Mouse report rate, you can stop the polling rate test and browse through all the Mouse polling rates in times per second or Hz.

Just In: Test your mouse online

Middle Screen vs. First On-screen Reaction

In my original input lag tests featured in this thread on the Blur Busters Forums, I measured middle screen (crosshair-level) reactions at a single refresh rate (144Hz), and found that both V-SYNC OFF and G-SYNC, at the same framerate within the refresh rate, delivered frames to the middle of the screen at virtually the same time. This still holds true.

However, while middle screen measurements are a common and fully valid input lag testing method, they are limited in what they can reveal, and do not account for the first on-screen reaction, which can mask the subtle and not so subtle differences in frame delivery between V-SYNC OFF and various syncing solutions; a reason why I opted to capture the entire screen this time around.

Due to the differences between the two test methods, V-SYNC OFF results generated from first on-screen measurements, especially at lower refresh rates (for reasons that will later be explained), can appear to have up to twice the input lag reduction of middle screen readings:

As the diagram shows, this is because the measurement of the first on-screen reaction is begun at the start of the frame scan, whereas the measurement of the middle screen reaction is begun at crosshair-level, where, with G-SYNC, the in-progress frame scan is already half completed, and with V-SYNC OFF, can be at various percentages of completion, depending on the given refresh rate/framerate offset.

When V-SYNC OFF is directly compared to FPS-limited G-SYNC at crosshair-level, even with V-SYNC OFF’s framerate at up to 3x times above the refresh rate, middle screen readings are virtually a wash (the results in this article included). But, as will be detailed further in, V-SYNC OFF can, for a lack of better term, “defeat” the scanout by beginning the next frame scan in the previous scanout.

With V-SYNC OFF at -2 FPS below the refresh rate, for instance (the scenario used to compare V-SYNC OFF directly against G-SYNC in this article), the tearline will continuously roll downwards, which means, when measured by first on-screen reactions, its advantage over G-SYNC can be anywhere from 0 to 1/2 frame, depending on the ever-fluctuating position of the tearline between samples. With middle screen readings, the initial position of the tearline(s), and thus, its advantage, is effectively ignored.

These differences should be kept in mind when inspecting the upcoming results, with the method featured in this article being the best case scenario for V-SYNC OFF, and the worst case scenario for synced when directly compared to V-SYNC OFF, G-SYNC included.

How To Get The Best Results

There isn't much that you can do to improve click latency besides using a wired connection when possible. If you still find that there's too much latency, check the debounce and polling rate settings, or check your computer and monitor settings. If you're using the mouse on a TV, you should make sure the TV is in 'Game' mode, which is usually when the input lag is at its lowest.

Mouse Buttons Test

First of all, users can test their left mouse button and right mouse button using this program to check if they are working properly. You can also try this CPS Test for clicking speed. 

For this purpose, bring your cursor inside the mouse model and tap on each left and right mouse button, respectively. If both of these buttons light up in the mouse model, then congratulations, your mouse’s left, and right buttons are functioning fine.

Meanwhile, the left mouse button is used for direct tasks such as selecting an object or performing actions on CTAs. Meanwhile, the right mouse is used to perform indirect jobs such as opening contextual or pop menus.

Mouse Scroll Wheel Test

Subsequently, our delighted users of this website can check if their mouse’s scroll wheel is working correctly or not using this fantastic program online without any considerable hassle.

Well, you can test your mouse or touchpad’s scrolling via this scroll speed test. So, navigate your cursor inside the mice model on this webpage and scroll up and down. If the up and down arrows light up, then your scroll wheel or touchpad is working fine.

Meanwhile, the scrolling wheel is used to quickly scroll up or down through a webpage or list document without using the scroll bar, which is usually placed at the right side of the page.

How to Perform a Mouse Latency Test?

Here we will discuss two methods to measure the mouse lag.

1. HTML JavaScript Mouse Input Performance Tests

There is a webpage by the name- . It provides the

There is a webpage by the name- . It provides the most accurate results for a mouse latency. 

It works by comparing the difference between hardware cursor movement with the last recorded mouse position.

After visiting the website, move your mouse around the blank box provided, in constant motion.

In the above image, the hardware position of the m

In the above image, the hardware position of the mouse cursor is in black, while the red box displays the actual mouse position. The difference between them is the lag. The red circle represents ‘two frames’ of input lag. 

You don’t have to go for many details in the graph, just look for the Average Small Delta. That is the lag duration. 

The Average Small Deta is calculated by time per mouse events.  

That is, if it takes 996ms to complete 126 mouse events, then average small delta or the latency would be 7.90ms. 

The best latency rate of a mouse in Windows should be around 8ms. While for the trackpad, it should be approximately 10ms to 12ms.

2. Humanbenchmark Test

It is another method to check the mouse reaction time. However, since it is a human benchmarking, it is not efficient enough.

Just visit this site and follow the steps. 

The test is simple: it shows you a red box for a r

The test is simple: it shows you a red box for a random period, following which it glows green. You are supposed to click the mouse as fast as you can when it switches to green color, and the test will record your reaction time.

You should perform this test for at least two to three times. The more times you do it, the more accurate an aggregate you’ll get.

For a more accurate result, you could also perform the test on two different mice. If the result shows a significant difference, then there is a problem with one of the mice.

The test is simple: it shows you a red box for a random period, after which it flashes green. You are supposed to click the mouse as quickly as you can when it changes color, and the test will record your reaction time. 

You should perform this test for at least two to three times. The more times you do it, the more accurate an average you’ll get. 

For a more accurate result, you could also perform the test on two different mice. If the result shows a significant difference, then there is a problem with one of the mice.

The website says that based on the data they have collected, the average human reaction time is 215ms. So if your reaction time is above 215ms, the extra time is due to mouse lag. 

For example, consider your average reaction time is 229ms in the test. If we believe 215ms as the average reaction time of humans, then extra 14ms is your mouse lag.

FAQs

Why is my mouse giving negative acceleration?

It’s possible that a bad port or a loose connection may trigger issues with your mouse. Make sure your ports are working well. You can plug in your mouse to another port and see if it improves its positive acceleration on the tool.

Is it right to turn mouse acceleration off?

It is all about putting your faith in the nature of the mobility of your mouse. If you want to use it at a set speed, or at the speed you are comfortable with, you will better off disable mouse acceleration. If you are playing a sniper game, a precise movement of aiming would be essential for you and acceleration could create hurdles in shooting accurately in FPS games.

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